The Apollo 11 moon landing, in photos

 edition.cnn.com  07/16/2019 15:09:28  2
Apollo 11 astronaut Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin salutes the American flag on the surface of the moon on July 20, 1969. Aldrin was the second man to ever step foot on the lunar surface. The first was Neil Armstrong, Apollo 11's mission commander.

NASA/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Updated 1509 GMT (2309 HKT) July 16, 2019

Apollo 11 astronaut Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin salutes the American flag on the surface of the moon on July 20, 1969. Aldrin was the second man to ever step foot on the lunar surface. The first was Neil Armstrong, Apollo 11's mission commander.

NASA/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Fifty years ago, Neil Armstrong and Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin made history when they became the first humans to set foot on the moon.

Their mission, Apollo 11, was considered an American victory in the Cold War and subsequent space race, meeting President John F. Kennedy's goal of "landing a man on the moon and returning him safely" before the end of the decade.

More than half a billion people watched on television as Armstrong climbed down the ladder of the Eagle lunar lander and proclaimed: "That's one small step for (a) man, one giant leap for mankind."

The CNN film "Apollo 11" explores the exhilaration of this moon landing through newly discovered and restored archival footage. Watch it Saturday, July 20, at 9 p.m. ET.

Apollo 11's crew is pictured in May 1969, the month before the launch. From left are Armstrong, Michael Collins and Aldrin. Collins piloted the command module that orbited the moon while Armstrong and Aldrin spent time on the surface.

NASA/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Apollo 11 was launched into space by a Saturn V rocket on July 16, 1969.

Ralph Morse/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images

Former US President Lyndon B. Johnson and then-Vice President Spiro Agnew were among those watching the launch at Florida's Kennedy Space Center.

NASA

It took the crew 76 hours to travel 240,000 miles from the Earth to the moon.

NASA

The Apollo 11 spacecraft consisted of a command module, Columbia, and a lunar module, Eagle. This photo, taken from the Eagle lunar module, shows the Columbia command module pulling away near the lunar surface.

NASA/Corbis Historical/Getty Images

Armstrong works outside the Eagle module shortly after becoming the first man to step foot on the lunar surface. There aren't that many photos of Armstrong on the moon. That's because he was the one taking most of the photos.

NASA/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Fans attending a Philadelphia Phillies baseball game cheer after it was announced that the Eagle had made a safe lunar landing on July 20, 1969.

Bill Ingraham/AP

Armstrong is pictured aboard the Eagle just after the historic moonwalk. As Armstrong lowered himself to the surface, people watching around the world heard him call it "one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind." Armstrong later said he had intended to say "a man" and thought he had. Numerous studies have been carried out over the years to discover whether he had indeed uttered that one little sound. Either way, his intention was clear.

NASA/Corbis Historical/Getty Images

A view of Earth appears over the lunar horizon as Apollo 11's command module comes into view of the moon.

NASA/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Aldrin walks on the surface of the moon. He and Armstrong spent a little over two hours collecting rock samples and data near the moon's Sea of Tranquility region. They also left behind a plaque signed by all three crew members and President Richard Nixon. The plaque reads: "Here men from the planet Earth first set foot upon the moon, July 1969 A.D. We came in peace for all mankind."

NASA

Aldrin's family and friends watch the mission from his home in Texas. Aldrin's wife, Joan, is in the polka-dot shirt. ABC, CBS and NBC spent between $11 million and $12 million to cover the mission from July 20-21.

Lee Balterman/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images

An astronaut's boot print on the lunar surface.

NASA/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Aldrin was the one who piloted the Eagle lander to the surface. He and Collins are still alive today. Armstrong died in 2012.

NASA

A view of Earth, photographed from Apollo 11 as it returned from the moon.

AFP/Getty Images

US Navy personnel assist the astronauts after their re-entry vehicle landed safely in the Pacific Ocean on July 24, 1969.

AP

NASA officials and flight controllers celebrate the successful conclusion of the mission.

NASA

President Nixon spends time with the astronauts, who were in a quarantine trailer for their first few days back on Earth. From left are Armstrong, Collins and Aldrin. Since Apollo 11, only 10 other men have walked on the moon. The last was in 1972.

MPI/Getty Images

« Go back