Teddi Mellencamp on accountability program backlash: ‘It isnt about certifications’

 pagesix.com  09/18/2020 16:53:08   Chelsea Hirsch

Teddi Mellencamp is holding herself accountable.

After her wellness program, All In, was criticized on Instagram this week for its allegedly restrictive methods, the “Real Housewives of Beverly Hills” star, 39, defended her approach to Page Six via email.

“We realize that social media is a blessing and a curse, and it can bring out the best in people and the worst,” she wrote Thursday. “We have so many fabulous friends and fans on social, but there are also detractors, and there will always be people who want to feel better by making other people feel worse. That makes me sad, but its the way it is.

“I decided to start All In when so many of my Instagram followers started reaching out and wanted to achieve the same level of accountability, I had found for myself. I realized this in fact is my purpose and what I love doing. Helping others feel their best.”

Several Instagram users shared their alleged negative experiences with All In with influencer Emily Gellis Lande, who kept their names anonymous. Some claimed that meal plans restricted participants to just 500 calories a day and they had to send proof of partaking in an hour of cardiovascular activity each day.

But Mellencamp denied those accusations, telling us All In’s meal plan has “evolved.”

“Our focus has always been on clean whole foods and our basic Jumpstart menu is 1100-1200 calories per day. There are a variety of nutritional food options on our menu. We have found that clients do best following a simple menu in the initial stages. We allow lean, clean proteins throughout the program and we encourage clients to eat balanced meals. Protein-rich veggies are a large part of our plan. Its all about tailoring a program to meet each clients goals and needs for a healthier lifestyle,” she explained.

Mellencamp has also come under fire for her credentials, and those of her employees, which some former participants found questionable.

“I became an AFPA-certified Nutrition and Wellness Consultant and AFPA-certified Personal Trainer, but thats not what our program is about. We employ accountability coaches, and each of them has been through the program, which makes a difference. It builds a community and there is a lot to be said for people who have shared lived experiences.

“We truly believe that the lived experience makes all the difference. Our coaches are not licensed health professionals and have no healthcare training. We practice what we preach and it isnt about certifications. If people are looking for certifications, then they need to go elsewhere, but if they want a helpful, nurturing, supportive accountability coach, theyre in the right place.”

Other participants claimed that they were forced to sign nondisclosure agreements upon joining, something an emotional Mellencamp addressed on her “Teddi Tea Pod” podcast.

“We require a consent form when you come through which actually protects them as much as it protects us because we want to make sure that you are not pregnant. You have not had a past eating disorder. That we are not licensed professionals and we have no healthcare training. So when people are saying NDAs, we want to make it clear that this is as much for you as it is for us. And then, the company has also evolved a lot from when we first started. I originally had an NDA because when I first started the show, people were signing up solely because they wanted to talk to me. And then I realized, like, ‘Okay. I need to put some things in place so people are signing up for the right reasons, not just to talk to a ‘Real Housewife.'”

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