Supermax: 'El Chapo' expected to join these men in prison

 edition.cnn.com  2/13/2019 6:17:00 PM 
Federal officials haven't said where Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzmán is going when he is sentenced in June, but one of his lawyers expects he'll end up at the Supermax prison in Colorado.

Susana Gonzalez/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Updated 1817 GMT (0217 HKT) February 13, 2019

Federal officials haven't said where Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzmán is going when he is sentenced in June, but one of his lawyers expects he'll end up at the Supermax prison in Colorado.

Susana Gonzalez/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzmán twice escaped from Mexican prisons in the last two decades. Now that he's been convicted in the United States, officials are likely to do their utmost to keep him in place.

The feds won't reveal his destination until he's sentenced and arrived, but the United States Penitentiary Administrative-Maximum Facility in Florence, Colorado — also known as Supermax and ADX Florence — fits the bill.

"He's going to Supermax, I'm sure, in Colorado," his lawyer Jeffrey Lichtman told CNN's "New Day" on Wednesday. "No one has ever escaped. It's absolutely impossible. It's not even an issue."

It's the nation's most secure Supermax prison, built for the worst of the worst in the penitentiary system, including the most violent inmates and convicted terrorists. Many of the more than 400 inmates spend up to 23 hours a day alone in 7-by-12-foot concrete, soundproofed cells.

A former warden once told CNN that imprisonment there is "far much worse than death." Here are some of the high-profile prisoners who are there now:

Ted Kaczynski, also known as the Unabomber, received multiple life sentences for mail bombings that killed three people and wounded 23 others between 1978 and 1995.

Bureau of Prisons/Getty Images

Eric Robert Rudolph is serving life sentences for several attacks, including the 1996 bombing of Atlanta's Centennial Olympic Park during the Summer Olympics, which killed two people and injured more than 100.

Erik S. Lesser/Getty Images

Larry Hoover, reputed leader of Chicago's Gangster Disciples street gang, is serving 150 to 200 years for murder.

Chicago Sun-Times/AP

Terry Nichols was convicted of being an accomplice to Timothy McVeigh in the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing that killed 168 people. Judges sentenced him to life in prison in federal and state trials.

Bureau of Prisons/Getty Images

Matthew Hale, the former leader of the white supremacist group World Church of the Creator, was sentenced to 40 years in prison for trying to hire an undercover FBI informant to kill a federal court judge.

Kari Shuda/AP

Ramzi Yousef was convicted in 1998 for his role in organizing the 1993 World Trade Center bombing, which killed six people and injured more than 1,000. He was sentenced to life in prison plus 240 years.

New York Times/AP

Former FBI agent Robert Hanssen is serving a life sentence without the possibility of parole for his role in spying for the Soviet Union and Russia. He was sentenced in 2002.

FBI/Newsmakers/Getty Images

Richard Reid is serving a life sentence for trying to blow up a passenger jet with explosives in his shoes in December 2001.

Plymouth County Jail/Getty Images

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was given a death sentence for the April 2013 double bombings near the finish line of the Boston Marathon. The bombings killed three people and injured more than 260.

FBI via Getty Images

Zacarias Moussaoui is serving a life sentence after pleading guilty to terrorism and murder conspiracy in connection with the September 11 hijackings.

Sherburne County Sheriffs Office/Getty Images

Umar Farouk AbdulMutallab is serving life in prison for smuggling a bomb in his underwear aboard a commercial airliner on Christmas Day in 2009.

Barcroft Media/Getty Images

Jose Padilla is serving a 21-year prison sentence. The US citizen was held for years as an enemy combatant on suspicion of training overseas with al Qaeda and planning to set off radioactive "dirty bombs" in the United States. He was convicted in 2007 of conspiracy to murder and providing material support to terrorists.

NBC News/AP

Faisal Shahzad is serving a life sentence for trying to detonate a car bomb in New York's Times Square in May 2010.

U.S. Marshals Service

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