Citizenship Amendment Act | Home Ministry seeks three more months to frame rules

 thehindu.com  08/02/2020 12:04:50 

The Home Ministry has sought an additional three months time for framing rules of the Citizenship Amendment Act (CAA), officials said on August 2.

Also read: Six months later, MHA yet to frame rules on CAA

The plea was made before the Department Related Standing Committee for Subordinate Legislation as according to the Manual on Parliamentary Work, the rules for any legislation should be framed within six months of the presidential assent or an extension must be sought.

The controversial CAA, which facilitates granting of Indian citizenship to persecuted non-Muslim minorities of Pakistan, Bangladesh and Afghanistan, was passed by Parliament nearly eight months ago and had led to protests in different parts of the country.

The President gave his assent to the legislation on December 12, 2019.

The Home Ministry has sought an additional three months time to frame the rules for the CAA. The plea was made before the Department Related Standing Committee for Subordinate Legislation, a senior official told PTI.

The Home Ministrys move came after the panel enquired about the status of the rules for the CAA.

Also read: CAA will not end in illegal migrants expulsion, MHA tells Supreme Court

The committee is likely to accept the request, the official said.

The objective of the CAA is to grant Indian citizenship to persecuted minorities  Hindu, Sikh, Jain, Buddhist, Parsi and Christian  from Pakistan, Bangladesh and Afghanistan.

People from these communities who had come to India till December 31, 2014 due to religious persecution in these countries will not be treated as illegal immigrants but given Indian citizenship.

After the CAA was passed by Parliament, widespread protests were witnessed in the country. Those opposing the CAA contend that it discriminates on the basis of religion and violates the Constitution. They also allege that the CAA along with the National Register of Citizens is intended to target the Muslim community in India.

However, Union Home Minister Amit Shah had dismissed the allegations and described the protests against the CAA as mostly political. He had asserted that no Indian will lose citizenship due to the Act.

Clashes between pro and anti-CAA groups had spiralled into communal riots in Northeast Delhi early this year which had left at least 53 people dead and around 200 injured.

Lok Sabha had passed the CAA legislation on December 9, 2019 and Rajya Sabha on December 11, 2019.

The Manual on Parliamentary Work states that, statutory rules, regulations and bye-laws will be framed within a period of six months from the date on which the relevant statute came into force.

The manual also states that in case the Ministries/departments are not able to frame the rules within the prescribed period of six months, they should seek extension of time from the Committee on Subordinate Legislation stating reasons for such extension which cannot be more than for a period of three months at a time.

Dear reader,

We have been keeping you up-to-date with information on the developments in India and the world that have a bearing on our health and wellbeing, our lives and livelihoods, during these difficult times. To enable wide dissemination of news that is in public interest, we have increased the number of articles that can be read free, and extended free trial periods. However, we have a request for those who can afford to subscribe: please do. As we fight disinformation and misinformation, and keep apace with the happenings, we need to commit greater resources to news gathering operations. We promise to deliver quality journalism that stays away from vested interest and political propaganda.

Support Quality Journalism

Dear subscriber,

Thank you!

Your support for our journalism is invaluable. Its a support for truth and fairness in journalism. It has helped us keep apace with events and happenings.

The Hindu has always stood for journalism that is in the public interest. At this difficult time, it becomes even more important that we have access to information that has a bearing on our health and well-being, our lives, and livelihoods. As a subscriber, you are not only a beneficiary of our work but also its enabler.

We also reiterate here the promise that our team of reporters, copy editors, fact-checkers, designers, and photographers will deliver quality journalism that stays away from vested interest and political propaganda.

Suresh Nambath

« Go back