LIVE COVERAGE: Tupola wins the GOP nomination for governor

 staradvertiser.com  8/12/2018 6:50:39 AM   Star-Advertiser staff Posted August

  • Video by Rosemarie Bernardo
  • CINDY ELLEN RUSSELL / crussell@staradvertiser.com

    Paige Arasaki, 6, peeks out from a voting booth as her mother, Kathy, votes at the Aiea High School polling station today.

  • CINDY ELLEN RUSSELL / crussell@staradvertiser.com

    Election volunteers assist voters at the Aiea High School polling station today.

  • CINDY ELLEN RUSSELL / crussell@staradvertiser.com

    Voters were handed a thank you card today after casting their ballot.

  • CINDY ELLEN RUSSELL / crussell@staradvertiser.com

    A voter casts his ballot at the Aiea High School polling station today.

UPDATE: 10 p.m.

State Rep. Andria Tupola has won the GOP primary for governor, defeating former lawmaker John Carroll and former Marine Ray L’Heureux.

9:20 p.m.

Former U.S. Rep. Ed Case will win the Democratic nomination for Hawaii’s 1st Congressional District, the Assciated Press projects.

8:45 p.m.

Former U.S. Rep. Ed Case appeared headed to a clear victory in his race for the Democratic nomination for the 1st Congressional District, and Gov. David Ige maintained his lead, in the second Hawaii election results printout of the evening.

In the Democratic race for lieutenant governor, state Sen. Josh Green still led the field. Steve Lipscomb remained slightly ahead of two opponents in the GOP’s lieutenant governor contest.

The latest results were contained in the second of four printouts expected this evening.

On the Republican side, state Rep. Andria Tupola was ahead of contenders in the governor’s race, and Cam Cavasso held an overwhelming lead for the 1st Congressional District.

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8:20 p.m.

U.S. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard easily won the Democratic nomination for Hawaii’s 2nd Congressional District, beating a relatively unknown opponent who challenged the incumbent for skipping debates.

Sherry Alu Campagna criticized Gabbard for ignoring debates, but the three-term lawmaker proved too strong for the challenger.

In the general election, Gabbard will face singer Brian Evans of Maui, who ran unopposed for the GOP nomination.

7:15 p.m.

In the Democratic race for lieutenant governor, state Sen. Josh Green is leading a field of well-known contenders by a comfortable margin.

Trailing him is state Sen. Jill Tokuda, Kauai Mayor Bernard Carvalho, state Rep. Kim Coco Iwamoto and state Sen. Will Espero.

In the GOP race, Steve Lipscomb was several points ahead of Marissa Dipasupil Kerns, and Jeremy Low.

6:55 p.m.

Incumbent Gov. David Ige is leading challenger U.S. Rep. Colleen Hanabusa by several percentage points margin in the early results tonight.

In the Republican race for governor, state Rep. Andria Tupola was ahead of contenders former lawmaker John Carroll and former Marine and nonprofit executive Ray L’Heureux.

The results come from the first printout of today’s Primary Election, with at least three more printouts to follow through the night.

The primary winners go on to the Nov. 6 General Election.

The Honolulu Star-Advertiser’s Hawaii Poll in July showed Ige with a four-point lead over Hanabusa which was a dramatic reversal of the 20-point lead she held in the same poll in March.

In the second high-profile race in Hawaii’s 2018 primary — for Hanabusa 1st Congressional seat — former U.S. Rep. Ed Case holds a commanding lead over challengers Lt. Gov. Doug Chin state Sen. Donna Mercado Kim, City Council Chairman Ernie Martin, and state Reps. Beth Fukumoto and Kaniela Ing.

5:45 p.m.

As Hawaii’s polling places were getting ready to close, today’s primary election continues to proceed smoothly, state officials said.

At 5:30 p.m. there were “no reports of anything major from the polling places,” said Nedielyn Bueno, voter services section head for the state Office of Elections. “It looks like it’s still going smoothly.”

Polls are scheduled to close at 6 p.m. but anyone on line as at that time will be allowed to vote.

4 p.m.

Just after 3 p.m. today, 34 percent of registered voters had cast ballots compared with only 27 percent at the same time in the 2016 primary election.

The reason could be because more than 238,000 absentee mail ballots were sent out this year, compared with more than 191,000 two years ago, said Nedielyn Bueno, voter services section head for the state Office of Elections.

“So far there have been no major glitches or no problems reported,” she said. “It’s been kind of quiet.”

Malfunctioning machines had to be replaced today at Jefferson Elementary School and Radford and Kailua high schools, Bueno said.

The first printout of election results is expected around 6:30 p.m. after polls are scheduled to close at 6 p.m., although anyone in line at 6 p.m. will still be allowed to vote and also register to vote, if necessary.

The first printout of results is scheduled to contain all early walk-in votes, some absentee mail ballots but no poll results, Bueno said. Subsequent printouts are scheduled for 8:30 p.m., 10 p.m. and 11:30 p.m.

2:20 p.m.

Voting is going smoothly at all 235 state-wide polling sites, although there was some initial difficulty contacting several precinct workers to confirm they were open for business, state elections officials said.

“The polls were all able to open on time,” said Nedielyn Bueno, voter services section head for the state Office of Elections. “We haven’t had any major issues as reported from the precincts. A couple machines had to be swapped out, which we did as quickly as possible.”

Although this is the first time that all 235 polling sites are allowing same-day voter registration “we haven’t heard of any glitches,” Bueno said.

Many people appeared to be updating their voter registration information rather than registering to vote, she said.

Turnout was reported to be light but on par with the 2016 primary.

12:10 p.m.

In years past, Shirley Yamauchi, a voting assistant official at Kapolei High School, said she typically would observe lines of registered voters in the morning at the precinct. This year, Yamauchi said, “It’s the slowest I’ve seen.”

Yamauchi, 43, a teacher at Kapolei Middle School, has assisted at polling sites for the primary election since 2012. She said she hoped the low presence of voters mean voters cast absentee ballots.

Nedielyn Bueno of the state Office of Elections said the voter turnout is 25 percent as of 10 a.m., similar to the 2016 primary election.

9 a.m.

All 235 polling places throughout the state opened today with a few minor glitches with voting machines.

Kailua Elementary School ran into a problem with a paper ballot scanner at about 8:30 a.m. today. “The machine was showing a printer error,” said Nedielyn Bueno with the state Office of Elections.

A troubleshooter was deployed immediately to the polling place and the machine was replaced.

Gregory Patterson, chairperson at precinct 42-01 at Kapolei High, said a voting machine briefly froze but was quickly resolved. “We undid that.”

For the first time, Hawaii offers same-day registration for eligible voters at all polling places today. Eligible voters, however, need to be at the correct polling precinct.

Volunteers at Kapolei High redirected approximately five people to other precincts. “We had to call in to our control center to confirm and redirect the voter to the correct voting area,” Patterson.

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Hawaii voters have their say today in several key races as the 2018 Primary Election wraps up after at least 160,000 people already voted either by mail or at early-voting sites.

Primary voters will select their preferences for governor, lieutenant governor, Congressional seats, as well as many state, county and Office of Hawaiian Affairs positions. Polls are open from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m., but anyone in line at 6 p.m. will be allowed to vote.

Hawaii had 741,007 registered voters as of July 14. In the 2016 primary, 289,367 votes were cast as Democrat challenger David Ige upset incumbent Gov. Neil Abercrombie. Now, Ige faces U.S. Rep. Colleen Hanabusa.

Hanabusa’s 1st district seat in Congress, meanwhile, is the object of a heated battle between several familiar names in Hawaii Democratic politics, including former Congressman Ed Case, state Sen. Donna Mercado Kim, Lt. Gov. Doug Chin, City Council Chairman Ernie Martin, and state Reps. Beth Fukumoto and Kaniela Ing. On the Republican side, the contenders are Cam Cavasso and Raymond Vinole.

Once all polling places have closed tonight, the Office of Elections expects to release the first printout with results of early walk-in votes and some mail-in results around 6:30 p.m. A second printout around 8:30 p.m. is expected to include more mail-in votes, all early walk-in votes and some precinct results. More returns are expected at 10 and 11:30 p.m.

For the first time, Hawaii offers same-day registration on Election Day for eligible voters during regular voting hours from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Those perspective voters will need to complete a registration affidavit and provide identification. Acceptable forms of ID include a Hawaii driver’s license, a Hawaii state ID card, a military ID card, a passport or current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck or other government-issued document showing your name and address.

But people planning to register to vote on election day could face some delays.

While people in line by 6 p.m. Saturday will be allowed to both register and vote, Nedielyn Bueno with the state Office of Elections recommends that people arrive earlier to register.

They will be required to have a government-issued photo identification, such as a passport, state ID or driver’s license. If not, they can use a current utility bill, bank statement, paycheck or a government-issued document with their name and address.

A poll worker will then call the Office of Elections control center to verify that would-be voters are at the correct polling place.

“Please be patient,” Bueno said earlier this week. “They do need to complete a registration affidavit form, and we need to confirm they’re at the correct polling place. It is an extra step, so there may be some wait time.”

People who are already registered to vote should not experience any delays because they will go directly to a ballot-issuing station, Bueno said. Those registering to vote will be taken to a separate “voter assistance station,” she said.

Mail-in voters can submit their completed ballots to any polling place within their county. A ballot postmarked on election day but not received by the County Clerk’s office by 6 p.m. will not be accepted.

Voters may find their polling place by going to elections. hawaii.gov.

early voting

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