Death Cab for Cutie sings about Amazon, tech boom and Seattle

 cnet.com  6/14/2018 8:29:48 PM  2  Marrian Zhou
Screenshot of Death Cab for Cutie's new music video Gold Rush.

Screenshot of Death Cab for Cutie's new music video Gold Rush.

Marrian Zhou/CNET

"They're digging for gold in my neighborhood, for what they say is the greater good / But all I see is a long goodbye, a requiem for a skyline." Don't recognize the lyrics to Gold Rush? It's a new song from Death Cab for Cutie, and it's a slam on the band's Seattle neighbor Amazon.

It's the first track on the alternative rock outfit's new album Thank You for Today. The album is set for release Aug. 17, but the music video for Gold Rush was posted to YouTube on Wednesday, where it's so far attracted more than 73,000 views. The tune's lyrics discuss Seattle's changing neighborhoods.

"Seattle has been transformed into an almost unrecognizable city over the past 15 to 20 years with the tech boom and specifically with the rise of Amazon," Death Cab for Cutie singer-songwriter Ben Gibbard, a native of the Seattle neighborhood of Capitol Hill, said in an interview with NPR. He witnessed the changes firsthand and said he felt unfamiliar with the neighborhoods he grew up in.

"For me what has been the most painful is just seeing the displacement of both people of color and creative communities from not only this neighborhood but the city," Gibbard told NPR.

Amazon didn't immediately respond to a request for comment.

Originally formed in Bellingham, Washington, a two hour drive from Seattle, Death Cab for Cutie has released eight previous albums.

The band didn't immediately respond to a request for comment.

'Alexa, be more human': Inside Amazon's effort to make its voice assistant smarter, chattier and more like you.

Fight the Power: Take a look at who's transforming the way we think about energy.

« Go back