US Treasury rejects Exxon Mobil request to drill in Russia

 hosted2.ap.org  4/21/2017 4:45:00 PM   CHRISTOPHER S. RUGABER and DAVID KOENIG

FILE - This Jan. 30, 2012, file photo, shows the sign for the Exxon Mobil Torrance Refinery in Torrance, Calif. A person familiar with the matter said Wednesday, April 19, 2017, that Exxon Mobil is seeking permission from the U.S. government for approval to resume drilling around the Black Sea with a Russian partner, state-owned Rosneft. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon, File)

FILE - This Jan. 30, 2012, file photo, shows the sign for the Exxon Mobil Torrance Refinery in Torrance, Calif. A person familiar with the matter said Wednesday, April 19, 2017, that Exxon Mobil is seeking permission from the U.S. government for approval to resume drilling around the Black Sea with a Russian partner, state-owned Rosneft. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon, File)

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin arrives for a meeting, Friday, April 21, 2017, at the 2017 World Bank Group Spring Meetings in Washington. Mnuchin said in a brief statement that the administration "will not be issuing waivers to U.S. companies, including Exxon, authorizing drilling prohibited by current Russian sanctions." (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

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(AP) — The Trump administration has denied a request from Exxon Mobil to waive U.S. sanctions against Russia to allow the company to resume oil drilling around the Black Sea.

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Friday in a brief statement that the administration "will not be issuing waivers to U.S. companies, including Exxon, authorizing drilling prohibited by current Russian sanctions."

Exxon said it understood the decision, while suggesting that the outcome will merely help European oil companies operating under less-stringent restrictions.

The decision comes just two days after it was reported that Exxon was seeking a waiver to resume a joint venture with Rosneft, a Russian state-owned oil company. Exxon said it filed the request in 2015.

The disclosure of Exxon's application was criticized in Congress by lawmakers who said the Trump administration should not reduce sanctions after U.S. intelligence agencies concluded that Russia interfered in last year's presidential election. Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., tweeted of Exxon's request, "Are they crazy?"

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson was Exxon's CEO before joining President Donald Trump's cabinet. While at Exxon, he cultivated close ties with Rosneft and Russian officials including President Vladimir Putin, and he spoke against sanctions that were imposed in 2014 in response to Russia's annexation of the Crimea region of Ukraine.

The sanctions bar U.S. oil companies from transferring to Russia the advanced technology that is used to drill more efficiently offshore and in shale formations. Exxon has said in regulatory filings that the sanctions could lead to losses of up to $1 billion.

An Exxon spokesman said the company's application for a waiver was made to meet contractual obligations under a joint-venture agreement in Russia, "where competitor companies are authorized to undertake such work under European sanctions."

Rosneft officials have said that their joint venture with Italy's Eni S.p.A. plans to begin drilling this year in the Black Sea next to the area where Exxon hoped to drill.

Irving, Texas-based Exxon has disclosed receiving three waivers from the sanctions during the Obama administration for limited work with Rosneft.

Exxon's critics urged the Treasury Department to block more waivers, which they feared would give new momentum to drilling in the environmentally sensitive Russian Arctic.

Shares of Exxon Mobil Corp. fell 32 cents to close Friday at $80.69.

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Koenig reported from Dallas.

Associated Press

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