Boeing's newest airliners make their debuts in Paris

 cnet.com  6/20/2017 7:55:45 PM   Kent German

Boeing soared into the 2017 Paris Air Show with two commercial airliners so new, they had barely been seen by the public before. Both the 787-10 and the 737 Max 9 only made their first flights this year, and Boeing was eager to show off its new prizes to airline customers and the press, not to mention fierce rival Airbus. Throw in a few aviation geeks who show up just to gawk and you end up with quite the event.

The 787-10 is the third version of Boeing 787 Dreamliner family. After rolling out from the factory in February, it made its first flight on March 31. At 18 feet (5.5 meters) longer than the 787-9, it has room for 40 additional passengers in a typical configuration and 15 percent more cargo. Depending on the airline's requirements, it will be able to carry between 330 and 440 passengers.

Like the earlier 787s, the aircraft is made of composite materials and it has a blunter nose and sharply swept wings. Final assembly will take place exclusively at Boeing's plant in Charleston, South Carolina, making It the first of the company's commercial aircraft to be produced outside Boeing's historic home of Seattle. Delivery to airlines like United Airlines, British Airways and launch customer Singapore Airlines will begin next year.

The 737 Max 9 is the newest version of Boeing's 737 airliner, which has been in production in some form for 40 years. The "Max" designation indicates that the airliner has been completely redesigned with more efficient engines, airframe modifications and split-tip winglets to make the wings perform better in flight. 

The 737 Max 9 was rolled out of Boeing's factory in Renton, Washington in March and first flew in April. It should enter service next year and will seat from 180 to 200 passengers. 

Held every two years, the Paris Air Show is one of the planet's premiere trade shows for commercial and military aviation. It's held at Le Bourget Airport outside the French capital, where Charles Lindbergh landed on his transatlantic flight in 1927.

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